Author Topic: Painting an AK receiver?  (Read 5823 times)

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Stonedog

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Painting an AK receiver?
« on: January 21, 2006, 07:19:25 AM »
I just built my first Rom AK kit.  Fires like a champ and acccurate as well.....well, good accuracy for an AK anyway :D

I built it on an unfinished receiver....

The parkerizing on the rest of the gun at at 99% plus....so I don't want to have the whole gun refinished...

Is there anyway that I can finish the receiver without using duracoat or paying to have it parkerized???

I found some high temp flat black paint...its used on grills and the like....or how about flat black epoxy paint???

Any suggestions??

Stonedog

BillyBang

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Painting an AK receiver?
« Reply #1 on: January 21, 2006, 07:54:30 AM »
Aluma-Hyde, Gun-Kote and a couple of others that I've heard about come to mind.
They are an epoxy type, durable.
The matt black in the AlumaHyde I hear is a close match to factory.

Billy

Stonedog

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Painting an AK receiver?
« Reply #2 on: January 21, 2006, 08:01:34 AM »
Where can a man buy himself AlumaHyde?

wera276

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Painting an AK receiver?
« Reply #3 on: January 21, 2006, 09:49:15 AM »
http://www.brownells.com/aspx/NS/store/productdetail.aspx?p=1117&s=


Flat black industrial rustoleum works VERY good on the receivers also.  Its in a big silver can about......$5 or so.  It is moderately heat resistant.  I put a painted part in my oven on 200 and then on 300 for a good 3 hours and it did nothing but cure the paint nicely.

very durable.

I have Alumahyde II also and the other paint seems to work just as good.  If you buy the Alumahyde make sure you get matt not satin.  I have satin and its pretty dang glossy and will out shine your Romy kit.

Also wiht the Alumahyde its best if you can heat the part to get it warm before you spray, and afterwards heat the part on a low temp for a bit to cure it.  I put my entire rifle (painted it all) in the oven on low.....prob just   under 200 for 30 minute stints through the past few days and it cured hard FAST!!!
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Stonedog

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Painting an AK receiver?
« Reply #4 on: January 21, 2006, 12:04:35 PM »
Wera,

So is the Alumahyde worth the extra 6$ plus hazmat shipping???

Honestly?

wera276

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Painting an AK receiver?
« Reply #5 on: January 21, 2006, 01:24:17 PM »
Yea that shipping is a kick in the ass isn't it!!!

Well i will tell you my experiences.

I did two Romy kits with Krylon BBQ grill paint and it worked fantastic!!  Stuff sprayed on perfect, was cheap, dried fast (to handle).  I did find that it too seems to take awhile to "cure" or get hard......a solid week if you don't bake it.  So i did some testing and baked on 250 for short stints allowing it to heat, cool, heat cool etc...prob 20,30 minute intervals.

I then used the Rustoleum........exact same results as the Krylon.  Actually seemed to work a bit nicer on the receiver as it sprayes on as a thinner paint than the krylon.   It does not claim to be "heat" resistant so i was hesitant to do the barrel etc with it.....but the receiver no not get over 200 so its fine on that.

Thought, what the hell, lets try the "suggested purpose made" finish.  And honestly.......i can't tell the difference.  It "may" stick a bit better but thats just a guess from how hard the paint is for me to wash off my fingernails compared to the others.  But thats not saying the other finishes don't stick good enough anyhow.   My Alumahyde spray looks fantastic.....little more glossy than i would like (semi gloss) but.....its on my AK that is my sort of baby doll one so i don't mind it looking a bit purdy :)

I would prob say if $$$ isn't an issue buy the matt black Alumahyde II.  If  $$ is an issue or time or whatever......the others do work just fine and i would not hesitate to use them again.  The key is to put the parts in your oven and bake on low to get the paints hard.  If you try to assemble even your safety lever or cover when the paint is dry but not cured its going to chip off very easy..........so bake bake bake.
current SKS's  54 Russian, 71 Yugo59/66, 74 China

Messiah Jones

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Painting an AK receiver?
« Reply #6 on: January 21, 2006, 02:08:47 PM »
SEM brand specialty products is what I use. First scuff thoroughly then clean with an evaporating degreaser. Then apply a couple coats of SEM "Self-Etching Primer" and allow to dry. Then apply as many coats of SEM "Trim Black" as you need. There is no need to bake. I use the aerosol stuff. About $8.00 per can for a grand total of $16.00 and it will cover a few rifles. Found at body shop supply stores and automotive paint stores.

 I stand by this method for a durable finish. It will be black, so if you want more of a parkerized look this won't be for you.

http://www.sem.ws/product.php?product_id=139



http://www.sem.ws/product.php?product_id=133

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wera276

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Painting an AK receiver?
« Reply #7 on: January 21, 2006, 03:06:07 PM »
Is that stuff heat resistant?

Is it epoxy based?

I use those products on motorcycles i paint, never gave it thought to ouse on the rifles....good call!!
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Onepoint

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Painting an AK receiver?
« Reply #8 on: January 21, 2006, 04:02:43 PM »
The drawback with finish systems that need primed is it really builds thickness on surface, which makes chipping worse.  The primer is needed for  bonding but is aslo a filler for surface imperfections.  It doesn't hold up to wear as well as other systems designed for straight metal finish such as epoxies or other metal treatments such as Bluing or Parking.


You can improve normal paint adhesion by using metal prep etching acid (which is part of the self etching primer) which can be found at Home depot, to clean off the oxidation before painting, Sandblasting works better still and gives a lot more surface to grip.  Beadblasting makes the surface slicker for paint to hold onto so sand or aluminum oxide is better for coating prep.

As far as heating some paints,  if it isn't heat activated, you can be doing more harm than good by baking it.  Moderate heat aides in flashing the paint, but cure is a chemical process which sometimes needs the surface to be porous to vent solvents and it can effect adhesion or paint property itself.

Allumahyde II sprays and flows better with a quicker flash  when warm but 300 degrees is more than likely pushing what it was designed for.  Brownells sells baking laquer in the same colors that will work better if you want to bake it,  Gunkote being better yet with some of the same colors but a very thin layer when done so it doesnt effect function on moveing parts.
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